The Fall of the House of Usher Questions and Answers
by Edgar Allan Poe

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What figurative language is used in ''The Fall of the House of Usher''?

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The narrator uses a metaphor to describe the "utter depression of soul" that he feels when he looks at the home and its environs. He compares this depression to "the after-dream of the reveller upon opium." A metaphor is a comparison of two unalike things where the speaker says that one thing is another. This comparison emphasized the deadening feeling he gets just by looking at the house. He also says that he felt an "iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart." This is another metaphor where the speaker compares the feeling of dread, of foreboding, to being cold.  His heart is not actually getting colder or sinking down.  

When the narrator describes the letter he received from his old friend, Roderick Usher, he describes the request for him to visit and "the apparent heart that went with his request . . . " This line employs a figure of speech called metonymy : when the writer replaces a detail associated with a thing for the thing itself. In this case, what the narrator means is that the...

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