What figurative language is shown in chapter 6 of Bud, Not Buddy?

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Figurative language is a very broad set of literary devices. In general, figurative language is language that uses various figures of speech to be more effective and/or impactful. It could include imagery, metaphor, simile, hyperbole, personification, onomatopoeia, and so on.

Chapter 6 begins with...

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Figurative language is a very broad set of literary devices. In general, figurative language is language that uses various figures of speech to be more effective and/or impactful. It could include imagery, metaphor, simile, hyperbole, personification, onomatopoeia, and so on.

Chapter 6 begins with Bud trying to get a meal, but he is actually being physically removed from the line until a family decides to be his fake parents so that he can get a meal. They stand and stand in line for a long time, but they finally get within sight of the door. Once the group is within sight of the door, they all begin talking freely and happily. A really great simile is used here to explain how the flood of talking begins.

When we finally got around the last corner and could see the door and folks going in it seemed like a bubble busted and people started laughing and talking.

Once Bud gets into the place, he sits down for an actual meal. There is a paragraph at this point that gives readers a great deal of auditory imagery about the sounds going on in the big dining hall.

The only sound you could hear was when someone scraped a spoon across the bottom of their bowl or pulled a chair in or put one back or when the people in front of you dragged their feet on the floor moving up to where they were spooning out the food.

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