What is the figurative device in this stanza from "The Song-Maker"? 'I was a weaver deaf and blind; A miracle was wrought for me But I have lost my skill to weave Since I can see.'I am pretty...

What is the figurative device in this stanza from "The Song-Maker"?

'I was a weaver deaf and blind;

A miracle was wrought for me

But I have lost my skill to weave

Since I can see.'

I am pretty sure it's a metaphor and I think the weaver is supposed to be like a song maker (like the title) but I don't know how to explain it.

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The first stanza of "The Song-Maker" reports that the speaker "made a hundred little songs" about love, its pleasures and its pains, and "sang them blithely." The problem was, the speaker had no personal experience with love and therefore didn't truly understand what she was saying in all those songs.

The metaphor of the second stanza compares the singer to a weaver whose ability to weave was based on her sense of touch. She could feel the motions needed for the weaving process. When she gained the ability to see, she "lost my skill to weave" because she couldn't repeat the process while she was looking at what she was doing.

In the same way, once she gains actual experience with love - "Love passed and touched me on the brow" - she can no longer sing her old songs about love, which came from ignorance of the topic. Having come to understand what love is and does, "I who made so many songs am silent now."

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