How did Andrew Jackson's policies contribute to the rise of the rival Whig party?

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Andrew Jackson's policies contributed to the rise of the Whig Party because that party was essentially an anti-Jackson coalition.  The party chose this name because Whigs were the English party opposed to the power of the monarchy.  The American Whigs felt that Jackson had taken too much power for himself...

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Andrew Jackson's policies contributed to the rise of the Whig Party because that party was essentially an anti-Jackson coalition.  The party chose this name because Whigs were the English party opposed to the power of the monarchy.  The American Whigs felt that Jackson had taken too much power for himself and for the executive branch.  They disliked things like his removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States and his decision to put those funds in the "pet banks."  They were offended by the number of times that he vetoed legislation.  These sorts of policies on Jackson's part helped cause the Whig Party to come into being.

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