To what extent were Lawrence of Arabia's actions in the Arab Revolt pro arab and/or pro western?  Extremely controversial figure during the time of the arab revolt, but I would like to know more...

To what extent were Lawrence of Arabia's actions in the Arab Revolt pro arab and/or pro western?

 

Extremely controversial figure during the time of the arab revolt, but I would like to know more on his actual role in the war and not how many portrayed him as the "Uncrowned King of Arabia" and the Hero of the Arab revolt. Like what were his inner intentions and for how long did he know about the Sykes-Picot agreement of 1916

Asked on by rak64

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Thomas Edward Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia, fought with the Arab guerrilla forces trying to overthrow the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish control of the Arab territory. Lawrence began his involvement in World War I as an envoy between the British and the Arabs but spent the vast majority of the war fighting with the Arabs. They had been told by the British that if the Ottoman Turks, who were allies of the Germans, were defeated, the Arabs would be given independence after the war.

Lawrence was unaware of the Sykes-Picot agreement which was secretly signed in 1916. After devoting himself to leading the Arabian forces in numerous battles against the Ottoman Turks,

when he found out about SykesPicot, Lawrence felt shocked, angry, and personally betrayed. Worse, he felt that he had betrayed the trust of Faisal and the other Arabs who had become his friends and comrades.

After the war ended, Lawrence did his best to influence negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference so that promises of independence, made to the Arabs by the British, would be honored. He was unsuccessful in these efforts. He spent the rest of his life regretting his failure to help his Arab comrades achieve the freedom he felt they had been promised and had earned. His efforts were completely pro-Arab.

 

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