To what extent is the uncivilized side of boys revealed in the sow hunt, creation of Lord of Flies, treatment of conch, and desire for meat and fun?From chapters 8 and 9, mainly centered on pages...

To what extent is the uncivilized side of boys revealed in the sow hunt, creation of Lord of Flies, treatment of conch, and desire for meat and fun?

From chapters 8 and 9, mainly centered on pages 147-150, thab 150-151

Asked on by manpreetg

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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This question is way too specific, and if we answered every part of it there would be nothing left for you to reflect upon and write.  I will spend a little time reviewing the uncivilized behavior of the boys in Lord of the Flies.  There is one group which is closer to "civilized" than the other, and that's the group which stays with Ralph.  It's Jack's group, the hunters, which demonstrates little restraint when it comes to the darker side of their human nature.  They're selfish and don't care about maintaining the fire or helping around the camp.  They, and Jack in particular, feel no need to obey the rules of order established early on and symbolized by the conch.  They are mean and self-absorbed and becoming wilder by the page.  Their clothes are nearly gone (by wear as well as by choice) and they've begun painting their faces for the hunt. Behind their masks, these boys are able to act in ways which are generally unacceptable and certainly could be called uncivilized. They only want to hunt, and they're getting more savage (as demonstrated by their sacrifice to the Beast in the form of a pig's head) each time they hunt.  The rules are gone, and so is their self-restraint.  You can certainly find those events in the chapters and pages you list. 

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