To what extent is Nora a tragic victim in A Doll's House?

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Until Nora comes to the realization that her husband is a source of oppression in her life, she can certainly be seen as a tragic victim. She is dehumanized and infantilized by her husband on a daily basis. She internalizes this treatment to such an extent that she does not understand her own strength or independence. Nora is a victim of her husband as well as of her own complacency in her oppression. However, once Nora suddenly understands that she has the power to change her situation, she is no longer a victim of her circumstances. One may argue that she is not a tragic victim because her story does not end in tragedy. However, tragedy and victimhood can be just a part of someone's life, be it a beginning or an end. They can be a moment, however long or brief. Nora can be viewed as a tragic victim for a portion of her life and then can be viewed as a valiant and brave individual.

I don't think Nora is a tragic victim at all! In the end, after Torvald has revealed to her that his personal...

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