To what extent is math related to engineering?I am applying for engineering (general engineering course) in university and I'm now writing my personal statement. The universities say that it is...

To what extent is math related to engineering?

I am applying for engineering (general engineering course) in university and I'm now writing my personal statement. The universities say that it is recommended to mention all the course related activities you have done in your life. The problem is that I haven't done much related to science. However, I did join a lot of math Olympiads and competitions.

So, my question is: should I write about all my math experiences, although I'm applying for engineering? Is it relevant enough, or would I be just going off track? How related are those two subjects with each other?

And how much will it affect my chances of getting an offer if I don't mention any science activities. 

Asked on by tuvshee

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lfryerda's profile pic

lfryerda | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

When you are taking an engineering program in university, you will have extensive math and science courses, especially in the first two years.  Many universities will require you to take a full year of chemistry and physics in your first year, regardless of your final engineering major.  In addition, you will get at least two full courses in calculus, a course in linear algebra, and likely a full course in computer science and another in numerical methods.  To verify this, it is best to look at the course calendars for the universities you are applying to.

Ultimately, many engineers find that most of the learning they do is once they finish school, and so you need to consider that the university program, in addition to teaching about engineering, is also teaching you how to become a better problem solver.  This is very relevant for your future employers since that is one of the reasons why they are hiring you!  This means that your training in math olympiads and competitions is incredibly relevant to your future courses.  

You should be as specific as possible in your statement, including the competition names, the exclusivity (how many rounds you needed to complete to be able to compete in them), the level (school, city, state, national, world), and your ranking.  The better the results, the more that the universities will recognize your potential to problem solve and the better your potential in the corresponding engineering program.

You should include math-related competitions as relevant to engineering programs.  Good luck!

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