To what extent would raising brain dead chicken be ethical? André Ford, an architecture student from the U.K proposed his 'Headless Chicken Solution" for a project at the Royal College of Art in which he was asked to look for sustainable solutions to the U.K.'s farming inefficiencies. These chickens are typically raised in overcrowded, dark rooms. After they've grown for a few weeks, they go through a process in which an automated machines cuts their throats before dipping them in scalding water to remove feathers. But the method is imperfect, and some chickens are still conscious when dipped, while some of them miss the throat-cutter entirely. Ford's idea is to spare chickens pain and suffering while maximizing space and production capability at the same time. The science is simple: remove the chicken's cerebral cortex and thus remove its sense perception. Some countries interested with the idea of this factory. Because it also make possible to buy chicken cheaper and help childrens who has some trouble with luck of food. What do you think about this? 

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I had never heard of this, but you raise an interesting question. I don't think this is ethical. It is true that the chicken does not experience pain, but it does not experience life either. There is something gruesome about this. Let the chickens roam free and live healthy lives,...

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I had never heard of this, but you raise an interesting question. I don't think this is ethical. It is true that the chicken does not experience pain, but it does not experience life either. There is something gruesome about this. Let the chickens roam free and live healthy lives, then kill them and eat them.
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Perhaps this would be ethical.  It might even be considered more humane for the animals since it would help them avoid pain.  However, I wonder if it is even feasible.  Can a chicken survive long enough to be harvested without that portion of its brain?  I supose the cerebral cortex doesn't control any bodily functions, but I wonder what removing the sesory perception would actually do to the chicken's ability to live.  I think many would argue that it is still cruel.  It would be ethical in terms of business ethics but I think many would argue whether it is morally ethical.

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It's hard for me to imagine a scenario in which this is truly "ethical." It's also hard for me to imagine not doing it if it would help feed hungry people. I hate the idea of mistreating animals and I hate the idea of hungry people.

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To answer the opening question directly, it seems that this practice would be ethical insofar as it kept the animals from feeling pain. If there is the additional benefit of making this product more affordable for low income families, that would be another mark under the column "ethical".

However, I expect many people would think that this treatment of animals is a sort of abomination. To posit the "headless" chicken option as the only alternative to the "norm" of this factory creates a false choice. There are other options available besides brain removal. 

 

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I do not think this would be unethical.  If we are already raising an animal solely for the purpose of killing it and eating it, there seems to be no problem with taking away its senses during its life time.  In a way, this could even be more ethical in that we do not subject the animal to pain and suffering during its lifetime.  

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