To what extent do you agree that Gatsby is presented as a victim of his own dream ?all his dreams , to get daisy the american dream, his unatainable goal and reference to context 1920s . the...

To what extent do you agree that Gatsby is presented as a victim of his own dream ?

all his dreams , to get daisy the american dream, his unatainable goal and reference to context 1920s .

the american dream

 

Asked on by wasmahm

1 Answer | Add Yours

stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Absolutely, Jay Gatsby lived and died by his vision of the American Dream. He created the person he wanted to be in order to achieve what he desired; rejecting his original name, parents, and goals for personal improvement as he invented a life history and attitude that would better support him in his quest. In the process, he convinced himself that the new version was the true and only version of who and what he was.

Each night he added to the pattern of his fancies until drowsiness closed down upon some vivid scene with an oblivious embrace. For a while these reveries provided an outlet for his imagination; they were a satisfactory hint of the unreality of reality, a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy's wing.

In the end, of course, the charade collapses. He is unable to attain the financial security and prosperity he strives to portray; he is unable to win the undying and complete attention of Daisy, the girl in his American Dream; he is unable to escape the consequences of the lifestyle he dreamed and lived.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,983 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question