What is the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution for 1984?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The exposition takes place at the beginning of the story and introduces the audience to Winston Smith and the dystopian nation of Oceania. The audience learns about the oppressive, authoritative government and Big Brother's omnipotent role as the nation's fearless leader. They also learn that Winston works in the Ministry of Truth, fabricating historical documents and records. Winston's bleak existence is illustrated and the audience sympathizes with the protagonist's oppressed life, which is completely controlled by the government.

The rising action includes Winston's rebellious journal entries, his

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parama9000 | Student

Exposition: Winston is introduced to the readers  as a man working in the Ministry of Truth. He begans to develop doubts and he decides to write a diary illegally.

Rising Action: He feels troubled and is brought into the supposed conspiracy against Big Brother by O Brien.

Climax: It was a conspiracy against him, though conspiracy is too strong a word, and he and Julia are captured and tortured.

Falling Action: He is losing his individualism and briefly remembers Julia, before he is subjected to further torture.

Resolution: He is completely stripped of individualism and he has accepted 2+2=5 and loves Big Brother.

simoneguerra | Student

Exposition: As the novel opens, Winston Smith, a member of the Outer Party from Oceania, feels frustrated by the oppression and rigid control of the Party, which prohibits free thought, sex, and any expression of individuality. Winston dislikes the party and has illegally purchased a diary in which to write his criminal thoughts.

Rising Action: Winston works in the Ministry of Truth. He alters historical records to fit the needs of the Party. He is troubled by the Party’s control of history: the Party claims that Oceania has always been allied with Eastasia in a war against Eurasia, but Winston seems to recall a time when this was not true. The Party also claims that Emmanuel Goldstein, the alleged leader of the Brotherhood, is the most dangerous man alive, but this does not seem plausible to Winston, as his hatred for the Party grows more and more intense. At last, he receives the message that he has been waiting for: O’Brien wants to see him.

Climax: Winston’s torture with the cage of rats in Room 101.

Falling Action: Winston’s time in the café following his release from prison, including the memory of his meeting with Julia at the end of Book Three.

Resolution: Winston’s spirit is broken.  Winston is released to the outside world. He meets Julia, but no longer feels anything for her. He has accepted the Party entirely and has learned to love Big Brother.

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