What are some examples of technology dehumanizing the society in the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury?

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First published in 1951, Bradbury takes the reader into a futuristic world that seems to have come to life in the 2000s. Technology such as the parlor walls, the seashell radios, and the "snake" machine all exist today in some way, shape, or form. These advancements Bradbury writes about were created to dehumanize his dystopian world, and it seems the same could be said for humanity today.

Mildred, Montag's wife, is the epitome of a dehumanized person. She partakes in everything technology and never has a real conversation with her husband. She is consumed by the technology around her and doesn't show loving or empathetic feelings towards anyone except the people on TV.

For example, Mildred is constantly wearing her seashell radios aka her wireless earbuds, especially when she sleeps. Montag tries to have various conversations with her, but when she feels done, she slides them back into her ears and slides back into la la land. These devices detach people from others and the world they...

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