What are examples of satire from Chapter 28 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?I don't seem to completely understand what satire is in this book exactly, and I need several examples of it from...

What are examples of satire from Chapter 28 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn?

I don't seem to completely understand what satire is in this book exactly, and I need several examples of it from this chapter. Would the fact that Mary Jane thinks the Duke and Dauphin should be tarred and feathered an example of satire? What are other examples?

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MaudlinStreet | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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In this novel, Twain focuses his satire on the society of the South, and the ignorance/gullibility rampant in humans. In this chapter, we see it in the townspeople who refuse to believe the real Harvey & William Wilks, and those who don't really care...they just want to see a corpse exhumed and a possible fight. In addition the motif of lies/truth is satirized in Huck's various stories. He finally recognizes the importance of telling the truth, finding it "safer" than lies, but he also fails in his own lies, which normally get him through any situation. We also see the shrewdness of Johanna contrasted with the gullibility of those around her. She's suspicious of Huck's story about Mary Jane, and knows that something's afoot.

Finally, we see a satirical look at the materialism of people. Even though the town is in the midst of figuring out fraud which has affected the lives of so many, they lose their minds at the sight of gold. This confusion allows Huck (in addition to the duke and the king) to make his escape. But this shows how easily people can be distracted from what matters.

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