What are two or three examples of prejudice in the novel Lord of the Flies?

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mizzwillie's profile pic

mizzwillie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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In the novel, Lord of the Flies by William Golding, examples of prejudice exist on the island.  First of all, there is the prejudice against Piggy, who is fat, wears glasses and keeps warning the rest about being civilized.  The boys make fun of him, even Ralph, whom  Piggy supports as a leader.  Another prejudice is the conflict between Jack and Ralph which is the prejudice of the physical hunter versus the more intellectual leader who pays attention to things which aren't fun such as keeping a signal fire lit.  Ralph says, "If a ship comes near the island, they may not notice us."  As the boys descend into savagery, the prejudice between the physical hunters and the more civilized intellectuals becomes more pronounced with Piggy and Simon's deaths.  The prejudice of evil toward reason on the island begins Jack's final hunt to flush out and kill Ralph.  That he doesn't succeed is by the accidental arrival of a ship which sees the island burning.

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gmuss25's profile pic

gmuss25 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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There are a couple of different types of prejudice portrayed throughout Chapter 1 of the novel Lord of the Flies. One particular type of prejudice concerns the negative view of those lacking physical ability. This prejudice is revealed in the way that Piggy is negatively treated by the other boys. Piggy is physically weak, and he suffers from poor vision and asthma. Piggy is continually bullied and also excluded from certain situations because he is overweight. In contrast, Ralph is admired because he is physically fit and attractive. Another potential prejudice in Chapter 1 concerns how the boys treat the younger boys. The older boys, referred to as the biguns, make all the decisions and significantly influence the group dynamic. In contrast, the younger children on the island, referred to as the littluns, have little say in any matters and are essentially left alone. Jack does not value their lives and even suggests that one of the littluns act like a pig so the hunters can abuse him during their ceremony later on in the novel.

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