What examples of personification does Romeo use when he describes Juliet's tomb?

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D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In the passage below, Romeo addresses Juliet's tomb:
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
And in despite I’ll cram thee with more food!
In this passage, Romeo personifies the tomb by assigning human characteristics to it. He describes it as having a "maw" or mouth, and a "womb." He imagines it, like a human, "gorged" with food. He says it has "jaws" and that he will force more food into it. All of these images liken Juliet's tomb to a hungry human body. Like a human body, it needs to feed, in this case on death.
Romeo is clearly highly distraught in this passage and contemplating suicide, which is what he means when he says he will give the tomb more food. However, he ends up killing Paris in addition to himself, and so offers the tomb more "food" in that way as well.

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ms-t eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The lines Romeo speaks are
"Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
Gorg'd with the dearest morsel of the earth,
Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,"

Translates to -
You hateful belly, you womb of death,
Stuffed full with the dearest morsel of the earth,
I will force your rotten jaws to open,

The examples of personification, giving human qualities to things that are not human, are calling the tomb a belly, womb, saying it has eaten its fill of Juliet, and calling the tomb's doors rotten jaws.

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