What examples of loyalty and betrayal are there in Chapters 20 to 25 of the novel The Kite Runner?

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CHAPTER 20

LOYALTY:  After realizing Amir's true intention of returning to Afghanistan, Farid's attitude about him changes. He becomes Amir's loyal sidekick during the search for Sohrab.
BETRAYAL:  There is the reminder of the Taliban, and the terrible atrocities that they committed against their own people. Zaman, the director of the orphanage, takes money from the Taliban in return for their pick of various children under his care.

CHAPTER 21.

LOYALTY:  Amir reminisces about his days with Hassan upon his return to the old pomegranate tree.
BETRAYAL:  The Taliban stone a fellow Afghani to death at the stadium.

CHAPTER 22.

LOYALTY:  Farid waits outside the Taliban headquarters until Amir returns. Amir fights Assef for the right to take Sohrab with him. Sohrab defends Amir against Assef. 
BETRAYAL:  Assef tells of the atrocities he has committed against the Hazaras and other Afghans.

CHAPTER 23.

LOYALTY:  Farid and Sohrab stick by Amir during his stay in the hospital.  Rahim leaves money for Amir in a safe deposit box.
BETRAYAL:  Although a minor form of betrayal, Amir learns that Rahim Khan has lied about the existence of the Caldwells, who Amir had hoped would take care of Sohrab.

CHAPTER 24.

LOYALTY:  Amir pays Farid for his services. Amir undertakes the monumental legal task of trying to adopt Sohrab.
BETRAYAL:  Sohrab decides to attempt suicide rather than continue reliving his "dirty" life.

CHAPTER 25.

LOYALTY:  Amir sticks by Sohrab and eventually is able to return with him to California. Soraya welcomes Sohrab into her life. Amir stands up for Sohrab when General Tahiri questions his heritage.  Amir and Soraya become more involved in Afghani social projects. General Tahiri returns to Afghanistan to serve his country once again. Amir runs the kite for Sohrab in remembrance of Hassan.

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The Kite Runner

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