What are examples of literary devices in chapters 10, 11, and 12..I am looking for several different types, not just similes and metaphors I would like to find 3 different types of literary devices...

What are examples of literary devices in chapters 10, 11, and 12..I am looking for several different types, not just similes and metaphors I would like to find 3 different types of literary devices in each chapter with 2 examples of each.

I am annotating my book and need help with this..

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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While there is a spareness to much of Eric Maria Remarque's style of writing, at times it is almost impressionistic; Remarque's narrative touch is direct and sensitive both.

CHAPTER 10

  • The chapter begins ironically: "We have dropped in for a good job." How can any assignment be "good" in wartime?
  • "This is an opportunity ...to stretch one's soul also" = metaphor
  • "We have to take things as lightly as we can" = idioms
  • "...and nonsense stands stark and immediate beside horror."= personification: abstract qualities such as "nonsense" and "horror" are given the animal/human power to "stand."
  • A bed is found which has "a sky of blue silk" = metaphor, comparison of the blue silk to the sky. 
  • "We sweat like monkeys" = simile
  • As the suckling pigs are roasted "We all stand round them as before an altar"=simile
  • "A couple of splinters whizz through the top of the kitchen window = onomatopeia
  • "The explosions come so fast that the splinters strike again and again against the wall of the house...." = alliteration with the repetition of the consonant sound /s/ and assonance with the repetition of the vowel sound /a/. Also, "pan and pancakes" /p/, "wall of the window" /w/ [Alliteration serves to speed up phrases, sentences, thus imitative of the action of the narrative.
  • "I run like a deer" = simile   "sweep round the floor" = metaphor as Paul compares himself to a broom
  • "A hiss, a crash,...a rising screech" = onomatopeia
  • "But the night is bad" = personification as night is given a behavioral quality.
  • "Burning houses stand out like torches." = simile
  • "Shells lumber across and crash down." = personification "lumber' like a stumbling person
  • "In spite of all the flying fragments" = alliteration /f/
  • "the drivers of the munition columns pour in like a swarm of bees = simile
  • "...with his nose in the air" = idiom for thinking oneself better than others
  • "...we sprawl back in them as in a theatre box"= simile
  • "the earth heaves" = personification
  • "...we should have run even if our feet had been shot off--we would have run on the stumps" - hyperbole (exaggeration)

CHAPTER 11

  • The fifth paragraph through eighth paragraphs are a poetic reverie, an extended metaphor: "It is a great brotherhood, which adds something of the good-fellowship of the folk-song, of the feeling of solidarity of convicts, and of the desperate loyalty to one another of men condemned to death....morning.
  • "invulnerable steel beasts squashing the dead and the wounded";"everything dances red and black before my eyes" -=personification
  • ...the red poppies in the meadows round our billets, the smooth beetles on the blades of grass, the warm evenings in the cool, dim rooms, the black mysterious tree of the twilight, the stars and the flowing waters and long sleep = imagery
  • "O Life, life, life!  .....No! No! Not now! Not now at the last moment...grey sky, grey fluid earth, grey dying" = repetition for effect
  • "Do I walk? Have I feet still?" = rhetorical questions
Sources:
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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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CHAPTER 12 

This chapter reads like a poetic stream of consciousness as Paul expresses his thoughts in quick succession.

Death comes as a being in the last two paragraphs.

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