What are two examples of imagery and metaphors from The Vagabond?

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In this poem, the merry vagabond imagines the natural world around him to be his home, providing him all the comforts of another person's home in a physical house. As such, he describes his metaphorical "bed in a bush"—this is, of course, not a real bed, but the bushes will...

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In this poem, the merry vagabond imagines the natural world around him to be his home, providing him all the comforts of another person's home in a physical house. As such, he describes his metaphorical "bed in a bush"—this is, of course, not a real bed, but the bushes will serve the same function for him as a bed would for another man.

The vagabond does not have any need for human companionship—instead, he feels supported enough with the road on which he travels and "the face of earth." This image, in close proximity to the discussion of friendships, gives the suggestion of earth as a living thing with a personality and a soul, which is like a friend to the vagabond.

More than once, the vagabond also refers to "the blow," saying that it may fall "soon or late" and make little difference to him. He does not mean a physical blow, here; the blow is a metaphor for death. The vagabond suggests that he is so happy with his existence, it does not matter whether death takes him now or many years from now—he has lived his life of choice.

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One of the most obvious examples of imagery in The Vagabond is:

Biting the blue finger

In this part of the poem, it is Autumn and frosts are becoming common. The 'blue finger' could represent either the man's hands turning blue with cold (circulation is not as efficient to the extremities in cooler weather).

Or it could represent the plant 'blue finger', common to South Africa. This interpretation would then link into the next line, where the fields are covered in 'biting' frost. 

white as meal

This is a simile--a type of metaphor which uses 'like' or 'as'. Here, the fields are frosty, looking like they've been 'dusted' with flour (meal).

warm the fireside haven

In complete contrast to the icy, frosty conditions of the lines above, this line invokes a completely different imagery. You immediately imagine a roaring fire, maybe an arm-chair, a book and a hot drink. This 'haven' is probably, in real life, a small camp-fire--wind whipped and requiring constant attention. But to the speaker, it is as if they are safe (and inside).

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