What examples in history best illustrate the idea that violent revolution is the most rapid force for change?What examples in history best illustrate the idea that violent revolution is the most...

What examples in history best illustrate the idea that violent revolution is the most rapid force for change?

What examples in history best illustrate the idea that violent revolution is the most rapid force for change?

Asked on by errghlack

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

There have been a lot of examples of violent revolution not causing change. Not real change, anyway. Less violent revolutions usually do bring about more change. In many cases, however, the population that revolts begins its time n power by ruthlessly quashing the population it replaced, committing the same or woad atrocities.
larrygates's profile pic

larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

One should also consider the changes brought about by the French Revolution, which was quite violent and bloody. It is also doubtful that the United States would have won its independence from Great Britain were it not for an armed insurrection. If one considers the events in Libya today, there is ample proof that sometimes armed force works best. At the risk of seeming whimsical, I am reminded of the words of Al Capone who once said one can get much further with a few kind words and a gun than with a few kind words alone. We all would like to think that changes come about through peaceful means; however when there are conflicting interests, human nature sadly dictates force as the most efficient means of bringing about change.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Perhaps the best example of this in the last 100 years is the Russian Revolution (Bolshevik Revolution) of 1917.  That violent revolution led to major and rapid changes in Russia and, eventually, the world.

Before the Bolshevik Revolution, Russia was a monarchy whose economy and society were seen as the most backwards in all of Europe.  By WWII, the Soviet Union was a major power with an industrial economy and a society that was radically different than it had been in 1917.  This rapid change was made possible by the violent revolution and the determination with which Stalin pushed for change after the revolution ended.

Violent revolutions overthrow entrenched social and political orders and cause major upheaval.  When this happens, rapid change is possible because everything seems to be up for grabs.  This is what happened in the Soviet Union after the Bolshevik Revolution.

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