What are examples of George as the archtype of caretaker?

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In Jungian thought, the caretaker or parent archetype is the person with creative energy who takes care of another.

It is easy to see George as Lennie 's caretaker. At the beginning of the book, George scolds Lennie for drinking too much water that George fears is dirty. This establishes...

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In Jungian thought, the caretaker or parent archetype is the person with creative energy who takes care of another.

It is easy to see George as Lennie's caretaker. At the beginning of the book, George scolds Lennie for drinking too much water that George fears is dirty. This establishes George from the start in his caretaking role:

“Lennie, for God’ sakes don’t drink so much . . . You gonna be sick like you was last night.”

George also coaches Lennie about how to act when they apply for jobs at the ranch. He wants to ensure Lennie gets a job so that they can be together and so that George can take care of him. George says:

"Now, look—I’ll give him the work tickets, but you ain’t gonna say a word. You jus’ stand there and don’t say nothing."

George also has the creative imagination to supply the narrative for the dream of the farm he and Lennie hope to buy. George uses the narrative to comfort and energize both himself and Lennie. A home of one's own is a fitting dream, too, for a caretaker to have.

At the end of the book, George shoots Lennie as a final act of caretaking, to save him from being lynched.

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