The Story of an Hour by Kate Chopin

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What examples of foreshadowing are in Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"?

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The newfound freedom Louise Mallard contemplates will not last, and the reader begins to realize it when the narrator uses the foreshadowing words "brief moment of illumination" to describe Louise's epiphany. Louise thinks about how no person has the right to "impose a private will upon a fellow-creature," but the narrator foreshadows that this will be only a fleeting thought since Brently Mallard reappears at the story's end to bring Louise's freedom to a sudden and tragic end.

Just before Louise leaves her room to go downstairs with her sister, Louise breathes a "quick prayer that life might be long." There wouldn't be any reason for readers to think otherwise since she has already been described by the narrator as "young," and so it is foreshadowing that Louise's life will, in fact, suddenly end with the shock of grief and disappointment that overtakes her upon her husband's return.

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One might also read the extra caution of Brently Mallard's friend, Richards, in confirming the news of...

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