What are examples of figurative language in "Winter Dreams?"

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F. Scott Fitzgerald uses figurative language such as similes, metaphors, and symbolism in Winter Dreams. As we read, we can make note of the figurative language.

Similes and metaphors are both forms of comparison, but similes use "like" or "as." A metaphor does not use those words, but we know that the simply-stated comparison is not literal. For example, when Fitzgerald writes "turning those big cow eyes on every calf in town," he is comparing the characters to animals. Hedrick says this about Judy, meaning that her eyes are wide open for potential men, because "she always looks as if she wants to be kissed."

Phrases such as "poor as sin" and "poor as a church mouse" are similes that can also be considered idioms, or common sayings. We understand that Fitzgerald is telling us they are very poor.

Fitzgerald also utilizes lists as figurative language:

Summer, fall, winter, spring, another summer, another fall—so much he had given of his active life to the incorrigible lips of Judy Jones. She...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 739 words.)

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