What are examples of epiphany in some stories in James Joyce's Dubliners?

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What is distinctive about Joyce's work is his use of epiphanies, or moments of sudden realisation, when characters realise essential facts about themselves or their context. "Araby" is of course one of the best examples of this in my opinion, as the teenage Romantic narrator, consumed by his quest to buy something from the bazaar for Mangan's sister, comes to the sudden realisation that what he is engaged in is not a quest for the honour of some fair maiden's hand, but vanity. You might find it interesting to identify and compare and contrast the epiphanies in this story to extend your analysis further.

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mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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 "A Painful Case" is a story in Dubliners that certainly illustrates what Joyce perceived as the emotional and...

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epollock | Student

Many of the short stories in Joyce's "Dubliners," fifteen in total contain epiphanies at the end of them. A few that are quite interesting are "An Encounter" where two boys meet an old man, and "After the Race" which is about a young man trying to be like his wealthy friends.

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