What exact quote does Circe use when she offers Odysseus immortality in The Odyssey?

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Circe is not the immortal goddess who offers Odysseus immortality in the classic epic. However, Circe does entertain and take care of Odysseus and his men for an entire year before happily sending them on their way to Ithaca. Similar to Circe, Calypso is an immortal goddess who entertains Odysseus...

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Circe is not the immortal goddess who offers Odysseus immortality in the classic epic. However, Circe does entertain and take care of Odysseus and his men for an entire year before happily sending them on their way to Ithaca. Similar to Circe, Calypso is an immortal goddess who entertains Odysseus for an extended period of time and prevents him from immediately sailing home. However, Calypso keeps Odysseus on her secluded island for seven years and refuses to allow him to leave until Zeus demands that she send Odysseus back to Ithaca.

In book 5, Hermes visits Calypso's island and gives her Zeus's message regarding Odysseus's fate. Calypso reluctantly agrees to allow Odysseus to leave her island but offers him the gift of immortality in hopes that he will stay. Calypso tells Odysseus:

. . . If your heart recognized
how much distress Fate has in store for you
before you reach your homeland, you'd stay here
and keep this home with me. You'd never die,
even though you yearned to see your wife,
the one you always long for every day. (lines 257–262)

By telling Odysseus that he will never die, Calypso is offering him the gift of immortality if he chooses to remain on her island. Despite the alluring gift of immortality, Odysseus decides to leave the comforts of Calypso's island and journey back to Ithaca.

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Circe does not offer Odysseus immortality in so many words, but she does offer him the opportunity to stay with her for a long time, and this would, presumably, prevent him from aging (as remaining with Calypso would have as well). Circe says:

Come, sheathe your sword, let's go to bed together,
mount my bed and mix in the magic work of love—
we'll breed deep trust between us.

Circe says that she will not hold Odysseus there on her island against his will, but she certainly seems willing to host him for as long as he would like. I always assume that this means that he would gain immortality by remaining with the goddess.

The nymph Calypso does directly offer Odysseus immortality when she says:

But if you only knew, down deep, what pains
are fated to fill your cup before you reach [home],
you'd stay right here, preside in our house with me
and be immortal.

Odysseus must be either incredibly attractive or incredibly good company—or both—for him to be so desirable to so many immortal women! He is absolutely offered immortality by Calypso and perhaps (indirectly) by Circe.

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Circe does not offer Odysseus immortality. She makes her appearance in Book 10, where she turns many of Odysseus' crew into pigs. One man escaped her treachery and went back to tell Odysseus of the situation, so Odysseus headed to Circe's palace. On his way there, he met Hermes, who gave him a way to avoid being put under Circe's spell and told him how to avoid Circe's other treacheries. Once he defeated Circe, Odysseus insisted that she turn his men back into men, and then they all stayed there for a year, living a life of luxury. When they left, Circe let them go peacefully and told Odysseus he needed to go to Hades to get directions from Tiresias.

However, the nymph Calypso does offer Odysseus immortality. In Book 5, Calypso is forced to allow Odysseus and his crew go free. When she talks to Odysseus and learns how eager he is to go home, she says:

"Son of Laertes, versatile Odysseus, after these years with me, you still desire your old home? Even so, I wish you well. If you could see it all, before you go--all the adversity you face at sea--you would stay here, and guard this house, and be immortal..." (Bk. 5, lines 212-218)

So it is not really an outright offer of immortality, simply a statement that if he were to stay with her on her island, he would be immortal.

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