To His Coy Mistress Questions and Answers
by Andrew Marvell

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What evidence indicates that "To His Coy Mistress" is a carpe diem poem?

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Edith Sykes eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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This part of the poem tells the lady what will happen to both of them before too long.  Soon they will be no more, just ashes in a tomb.  If she holds onto to her honor for too long, it will die with her, therefore, she should embrace his love and submit.

Seize the day before it is too late! 

"Thy beauty shall no more be found,  Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity, And your quaint honour turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust"

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linda-allen eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The Latin phrase carpe diem is most often translated into English as "seize the...

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gbeatty eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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neelaparajita | Student

This poem is a carpe diam poem. As it begins he says to coy mistress, if they have enough time, they can make love slowly and take a long time to be united. But in the next stanza, he says they have not enough time because time is rushing away and he is seeing the vast eternity lying infront of them.

For that reason, he is hurrying to make love. Because he does not want to loss the chance of making love. Here he uses a fine syllogism to show carpe diam theory.

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