What textual evidence from Fahrenheit 451 illustrates Captain Beatty's views on books?

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The best place in the Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 that expresses Captain Beatty's views is when Montag takes a "sick" day. Montag is overwhelmed and grieving over a woman who burned herself to death the night before while the firemen were burning her books. Captain Beatty shows up to talk to Montag and help him to...

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The best place in the Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 that expresses Captain Beatty's views is when Montag takes a "sick" day. Montag is overwhelmed and grieving over a woman who burned herself to death the night before while the firemen were burning her books. Captain Beatty shows up to talk to Montag and help him to get over his issues. First Beatty explains the history of the decline of books. He says that TV and radio conditioned people to want to be entertained more than they wanted to learn or to think for themselves. Then, he says, books were condensed more and more so they would sell to under-attentive audiences. But then Captain Beatty's lecture takes a turn and he dives deeper to expose why the burning of books became law.

"Colored people don't like the Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people don't feel good about Uncle Tom's Cabin. Burn it. Someone's written a book on tobacco and cancer of the lungs? The cigarette people are weeping? Burn the book. Serenity, Montag. Peace, Montag" (59).

The answer to books is always "Burn it." Why? Because people get offended. People argue and the world is not at peace when there are conflicting views and ideas out there in the world.

"Don't give them any slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy. Any man who can take a TV wall apart and put it back together again. . . is happier than any man who tries to slide-rule, measure, and equate the universe, which just won't be measured or equated without making man feel bestial and lonely. I know, I've tried it" (61).

Captain Beatty tried it! He is very well-read. He doesn't like books because his experience with them didn't satisfy his thirst for understanding, nor did he find a better life by reading them. He got upset that the authors couldn't agree on anything. Captain Beatty believes, as does their society, that it is better to be hedonistic and entertained rather than educated because it apparently brings more happiness, fewer offended people, and less strife.

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