What is the evidence and analysis to show Boo Radley's courage in To Kill a MockingBird?For example, leaving them presents, putting on a blanket for Scout, and protecting the children when they...

What is the evidence and analysis to show Boo Radley's courage in To Kill a MockingBird?

For example, leaving them presents, putting on a blanket for Scout, and protecting the children when they were attacked by Bob Ewell?

Asked on by amstro88

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Boo had evidently been keeping an eye on Jem and Scout for a long time, possibly even longer than the children had been daring each other to touch the house or playing the Boo Radley game. I don't know that Boo's acts of kindness--giving the gifts, mending the pants, and placing the blanket on Scout's shoulders--showed great bravery, but he must have had to screw up his courage just to sneak outside each night. On most occasions, there were probably no other people around to see him, since he must have done most of his prowling in the early hours of the morning. But on the night of the fire, he considered it so important to provide Scout with a blanket that he was willing to risk being seen with so many other people about. Boo's decision to tangle with Bob Ewell was undoubtedly a courageous act, however, since he risked his life to save the children he had been watching over. Bob would have killed the children as well as Boo had he been able, but Boo proved to be the better man on this night: His desire to protect the children was greater than Bob's motivation to kill them.

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