What errors do the property │-a│= a attempt to avoid when it states the equation is only true for a≥0?Please illustrate through the use of an example!

vishuk | Student
  1. Only values of a which are greater than or equal to 0 will make

the expression inside the absolute symbol (that is -a) negative.

Therefore, for the property |-a| = a to be meaningful, a must be

greater than or equal to 0.

If a < 0, the -a will be positive, and therefore, the absolute value

notation will become redundant.

For example, let a = 5. Then -a = -5 and since |-a| = a, we get

|-5| = 5

On the other hand, of a = -3, then -a = 3 and since |-a| = a, we

get |3| = 3. Here, the absolute value notation became

redundant.

visheshkanitkar | Student

Only values of a which are greater than or equal to 0 will make

the expression inside the absolute symbol (that is -a) negative.

Therefore, for the property |-a| = a to be meaningful, a must be

greater than or equal to 0.

If a < 0, the -a will be positive, and therefore, the absolute value

notation will become redundant.

For example, let a = 5. Then -a = -5 and since |-a| = a, we get

|-5| = 5

On the other hand, of a = -3, then -a = 3 and since |-a| = a, we

get |3| = 3. Here, the absolute value notation became

redundant.

 

visheshkanitkar | Student

Only values of a which are greater than or equal to 0 will make

the expression inside the absolute symbol (that is -a) negative.

Therefore, for the property |-a| = a to be meaningful, a must be

greater than or equal to 0.

If a < 0, the -a will be positive, and therefore, the absolute value

notation will become redundant.