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Empiricism is a philosophical term. Formally defined, empiricism is

the view that all concepts originate in experience, that all concepts are about or applicable to things that can be experienced, or that all rationally acceptable beliefs or propositions are justifiable or knowable only through experience. (Encyclopedia Britannica)

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Empiricism is a philosophical term. Formally defined, empiricism is

the view that all concepts originate in experience, that all concepts are about or applicable to things that can be experienced, or that all rationally acceptable beliefs or propositions are justifiable or knowable only through experience. (Encyclopedia Britannica)

The word empiricism is derived from the Greek word empeira, which means experience. Empiricism is a theory that all knowledge comes from sensory experience. Knowledge comes from observations collected through the five senses.

Empiricism is prevalent in science. In science, empiricism involves the use of experiments to collect data based on actual observations. This allows researchers to collect evidence based on real-word experience and not assumptions. This concept implies that real-world observations are more concrete than intuition. These observations are recorded as empirical data.

In order to better understand empiricism, it's important to realize that empiricism directly contrasts with rationalism. Rationalism is the concept that knowledge is developed through exploration, intuition, and revelation.

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Empiricism is a philosophical concept that goes well with modern attitudes -- attitudes, in particular, towards science.  It is the idea that we should base knowledge on what we can see, touch, or measure.  In other words, knowledge should be based on things that are empirically tangible.

This is as opposed to previous schools of thought that held that we know things by thinking about them.  This school of thought tried to understand things in terms of how they sounded theoretically or how well they conformed to accepted thoughts.  An example of this is how some people thought the planets moved in perfect circles simply because that is how it should be.

Empiricism, by contrast, demands that things be measured and proven.  Empiricists pointed out that observation does not bear out the idea that planets moved in circles.  So an empiricist would say that we should not believe that planets move in circles because tangible observations show that they do not (no matter what theories say they should do).

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