What are the effects that texting has on teenagers?What are the effects that texting has on teenagers?

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scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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One of the most significant effects I've witnessed regarding teens and texting (or anyone texting for that matter) is not simply regarding a teen's education.  Yes, texting does seem to have a detrimental effect on teens' writing and communication skills, and yes, I teach teens whose parents text their children during class, all while knowing that their children are in class supposedly learning. Those are serious problems, but texting affects more than one's education.  Students tell me that they text while they're at the dinner table (if their family eats together), while they're in their car with their family and friends, or even while they're on a date. Texting not only removes the possibility of a lot of face time with other humans, but it also removes the basic positive qualities of human communication.  When texting (unlike talking on the phone), teens do not have to gauge facial expression, vocal inflection, or emotion.  Without those types of reactions to whatever they are "saying," a basic breakdown of deep relationships is bound to occur.

 

drmonica's profile pic

drmonica | (Level 2) Associate Educator

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Texting is a lot of fun, but it can distract teenagers to the point that they spend time texting friends even though their parents, siblings, and other family are in the same room or automobile. This activity cuts back on valuable personal interactions with people who love you.

Texting also requires a shorthand type of spelling that can spill over into formal writing and cause your grade to drop on assignments. It sets a lot of teachers' teeth on edge to see "4" instead of "for."

lrwilliams's profile pic

lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

The effects of texting on teens is wide ranging. I think the biggest concern is that teens no longer have to learn to communicate with people face to face. I have observed teens that are in the same room as each other texting to each other rather than having a conversation. 

 

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Texting affects teens in myriad ways. Texting eliminates the need for face to face conversation. Texting inhibits impulse control as it has immediate results, so teens might say what immediately comes to mind instead of thinking about the right thing to say. There can be physical symptoms such as painful fingers or thumbs from the constant stress put on the joints from too much texting. The following link has an interesting article, but I’m not sure what the personal agenda of the website is.

http://www.injuryboard.com/national-news/Teens-Texting-Hurts-Sleep-Maturity.aspx?googleid=263708

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Although texting is yet another modern miracle of communication, it is a shortcut for social interaction and an unexpected addiction to boot. Texting leads to shortened and poor grammar practices which bleed over into the classroom (as another post mentions, just check out the abysmal spelling found on eNotes Q&A posts!). Additionally, texting while driving has become a serious and deadly problem on our public roads.

coachingcorner's profile pic

coachingcorner | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

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Texting has an interesting role in the history of teenagers' typical development of language and linguistic skills. Language acquisition in the human has several generally recognised chronological stages from the rapid vocabulary building activities of the babbling toddler to the widely-read articulate college student.

During adolescence, teenage kids have done all their practicing, most of their basic language acquisition and literacy. Now they are into using language for socilaizing more than ever - and that's where texting comes in. The adolescent herd instinct drives teens to use language for exclusion purposes - to build private cliques,exclude adults by inventing a new language or jargon like a private club that only the young have access to. To do this, the new phones are a godsend,being fast,instant, cheap and easy. Teens will shorten words,abbreviate to extremes,invent new terms (l8r for later) and use code. The debate is 'will this change spelling and the English language forever?'

booksnmore's profile pic

booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

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My biggest concern is that it removes them from potentially intimate relationships in their close proximity--family and friends who are in the same room--and puts them into somewhat superficial relationships with people who are not physically present. So much of texting involves shallow conversation as demonstrated by texting acronymns/text messaging jargon. Nevertheless, it appears that texting is here to stay. So, looking on the bright side, it does allow teens to be in immediate contact with their parents (assuming the parents have capacity to text!)

One additional concern that is not limited to teens...  Studies are now demonstrating that texting has a negative effect on driving. Teens, as new drivers and frequent texters, are probably more impacted by this concern than anyone else.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I don't know which kinds of effects you are thinking of, but to me, the main effect is on teens' writing.

The effects of texting can, I believe, be seen right here on this site.  Hardly anyone takes the time to do things like capitalizing or punctuating their questions.  (That includes this question...) You also see things like "u" and "plz" on here.

I think that texting has gotten teens used to typing in shorthand, you might say.  It has gotten them away from using proper spelling and punctuation.  You can argue that this is irrelevant, but it's certainly jarring to those of use who are from an older generation (or at least it is to me).

clfwbm's profile pic

clfwbm | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I believe the use of actual speaking skills and social interaction skills will be affected by texting.  The use of correct grammar and spelling is impaired.  Also. patience is not developed as their need for immediate gratification is met.  They are not learning to endure and wait for things to come.

yogamama's profile pic

yogamama | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

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What are the effects that texting has on teenagers?

What are the effects that texting has on teenagers?

The effects on teens are also the problem society is facing.  Too much information at rapid speeds.  Also the teens do not understand how to communicate other than through devices, which while helpful is harming their face to face interractions.  We have class meetings and "filling our buckets" times with old fashioned speech and writing of letters to create positive interraction that is delayed.  Text is here to stay, now as educators we have to teach them the place technology has in society, its advantages and the disadvantages. 

yogamama's profile pic

yogamama | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I don't know which kinds of effects you are thinking of, but to me, the main effect is on teens' writing.

The effects of texting can, I believe, be seen right here on this site.  Hardly anyone takes the time to do things like capitalizing or punctuating their questions.  (That includes this question...) You also see things like "u" and "plz" on here.

I think that texting has gotten teens used to typing in shorthand, you might say.  It has gotten them away from using proper spelling and punctuation.  You can argue that this is irrelevant, but it's certainly jarring to those of use who are from an older generation (or at least it is to me).

  I could not agree more...u, thx and so on.  The list is mind boggling.  In the classroom I have started each writing with...who is our audience and once that is established the texting jargon has been eliminated.  It is a constant battle and reminder but also makes them focus on audience, audience, audience!

yogamama's profile pic

yogamama | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

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True but to teach communication we must also not just address the skill but address the world we are now part of.  The technology age...where communication is fast and impersonal.

livingroom's profile pic

livingroom | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

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I think communication with humans is a crucial skill for the survival of the human race.  Without the ability to talk and understand each other, we will be lost in ignorance, prejudice and misbeliefs.

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