What are the effects of high fructose corn syrup on plant growth?

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To understand the nature of this question, let's look at the process that provides energy for the plant to make new cells, photosynthesis.  Photosynthesis takes carbon dioxide from the air, water from the ground, uses radiant energy (usually from the sun) to produce glucose (simple sugar) and oxygen, which is...

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To understand the nature of this question, let's look at the process that provides energy for the plant to make new cells, photosynthesis.  Photosynthesis takes carbon dioxide from the air, water from the ground, uses radiant energy (usually from the sun) to produce glucose (simple sugar) and oxygen, which is returned to the air.

Now let's look at what we are doing here.  We are adding high fructose corn syrup to the list of ingredients, the reactants.  The high fructose corn syrup is half fructose and half glucose.  Instead of water diffusing into the plant's cells, as is required by photosynthesis, water will come out of the plant's cells in an effort to increase the water content in the high fructose corn syrup.  It will have the same effect as not providing the plant with water.  The plant will lose inner water pressure as the water leaves the large vacuoles.  It will take a "droopy", wilted demeanor, much the same as when it undergoes a dry spell without watering.

It would seem like a good idea to provide the plant with a form of the sugar it needs to live and make new cells for growth, but in reality it has a debilitating effect.  It hampers a natural process the plant takes care of all by itself, given the proper input of raw materials.

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