The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde book cover
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What effects does Mr. Hyde have on other people in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?  

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In the concluding chapter of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Jekyll notes that all men have a dualist quality to their nature. Through his scientific knowledge, Jeckyll was able to separate the one from the other. From this experiment emerges Hyde, who is a physical manifestation of the worst impulses and inclinations long suppressed by Jeckyll, made free and unrestrained.

Jeckyll notes, in that same chapter, that Hyde's appearance or presence invariably causes among other people a great deal of repugnance. This is because Hyde is a walking incarnation of a human being's own worst nature. The reaction is, by all accounts, universal.

We see this reflected within the plot of the story. Everyone who meets with Hyde or has an encounter with him exhibits a visceral distaste for him, which often they themselves do not fully understand. We see this in the story's opening chapter, when Enfield tells the story of his encounter with Hyde, noting that "I had taken a...

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