The Crucible Questions and Answers
by Arthur Miller

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What is the effect of Sarah Good's and Tituba's talk about flying south? Why does Miller include this talk?

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The significance of Miller's inclusion of Tituba's and Sarah Good's talk of flying south is the highlighting of the tremendous cultural disparity between Tituba and the rest of the community.

Tituba hails from Barbados and was brought to Salem in order to work as a slave under Parris. Thus, Tituba views the devil in a radically different light than the Puritans who surround her; for those living in Barbados, the devil (as a symbol, as well as in some forms of religious worship) was a regular component of daily life and not a representative of deep and pervasive evil. Tituba even describes the devil as a "pleasureman" who sings and dances; by her standards, he is relatively harmless.

Thus, the idea of a satanic figure appearing to take her back home is two-fold: it signifies Tituba's outsider status in Salem, as well as her desperation to leave these oppressive circumstances. Sarah Good's echoing of these sentiments ("...tell him Sarah Good is goin' too!") shows just how manic the entire...

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