What is each characters idea towards love/marriage in Romeo and Juliet?We have our Romeo and Juliet test tomorrow, and on our study guide it said to make sure to know what each characters idea of...

What is each characters idea towards love/marriage in Romeo and Juliet?

We have our Romeo and Juliet test tomorrow, and on our study guide it said to make sure to know what each characters idea of love was. The only example I can think of is how juliet said that she though of marriage as an honor when her mother and nurse told her of how Paris wanted to make her a bride.

Asked on by kurlykarman

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Both central characters hold an interesting view about the nature of love.  On one hand, Romeo starts off the play in a very immature light, being consumed with infatuation and believing that to be love.  His initial feelings towards Juliet are based off of an infatuation and the spurning feelings he experienced at the hands of Rosaline.  I think that this helps to feed his perception that he is "in love," when in reality it might be something else.  Certainly, his commitment to Juliet increases with his killing of Tybalt and his desire to run away with Juliet helps to strengthen the bonds that are there, proving that "love" might be something that has to be forged through experience rather then assertions through words.  For Juliet, love seems to be defined by a commitment to another.  In this respect, she is much more mature than Romeo.  Her vision of love is one where actions and words have to be convergent.  When she asks Romeo, point blank, "Dost thou love me," it is a reflection of a belief that love requires function and surmise being united.  It is from this moment that Juliet is presented as a very pragmatic force that seeks to be with the one she loves.  In both characters' representation of what it means to love, Shakespeare might be evoking the complex and intricate nature of love as an experience.

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