What is the dramatic question, inciting incident, climax, and antagonist of this play? I can't figure them out.

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The dramatic question would be whether Nora, who lies to her husband Torvald about small things like her macaroon-eating, will get caught lying about the loan.

Of course, the inciting incident would be when Krogstad appears and blackmails Nora with the forged signature she used to secure a loan....

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The dramatic question would be whether Nora, who lies to her husband Torvald about small things like her macaroon-eating, will get caught lying about the loan.

Of course, the inciting incident would be when Krogstad appears and blackmails Nora with the forged signature she used to secure a loan. If Nora is unable to convince Torvald to let Krogstad keep his job, Krogstad will reveal Nora’s forgery. The kicker, of course, is that Torvald wants to fire Krogstad for forging someone’s name.

Since the primary conflict is between Nora and Krogstad, the climax occurs when Torvald retrieves the letter that Kristine insisted to put in the Helmers’ mailbox. This answers the dramatic question from the beginning of the play.

While one antagonist is Krogstad because of his threats to Nora, most critics agree that the real antagonist is the patriarchal society in which Nora lives. Throughout the play, Nora has to hide her true self from her husband in order to make him happy. She does this at the expense of her honesty, intelligence, and independence. Just before she leaves Torvald, he implies she is dependent on him like a child and only made her “mistake” because of her ignorance. These statements show that Nora is viewed as nothing more than a child, when she is actually the most responsible adult in the entire play.

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Nora Helmer is the protagonist of this play, as she is the leading character and the actions that constitute the play primarily revolve around her. As such, the dramatic question centers around her main conflict. We see Nora's husband, Torvald, treating her—essentially—like a child; for example, he monitors her consumption of sweets in order to protect her teeth, and he calls her all sorts of diminutive nicknames like his "little squirrel" and such. She even hides her errant behavior from him as a child might. The opening scene between the two of them makes us wonder if she will ever realize that she is acting and being treated like a child, and what would happen if she does: the dramatic question.

The inciting incident which so disturbs Nora's peace is the appearance of Krogstad: he reveals that Nora forged her father's name on the loan contract and blackmails her, compelling her to beg her husband to keep Krogstad in his employ.

Some might consider the antagonist of the play to be Nora's husband, Torvald; however, it is more accurate to say it is society in general. It isn't only Torvald who treats Nora like a doll; it was her father, too. And, to a certain extent, Krogstad also exploits Nora's diminished position as a woman in society. It is the patriarchal society that puts women at a social and legal disadvantage which antagonizes Nora.

Torvald is merely society's representative, and the climax of the play takes place when Nora confronts him about his always having treated her like a doll, including when she tells him that she is leaving their family to be an independent woman.

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Nora is neither the protagonist nor the antagonist in A  Doll'sHouse.

Nils Krogstag is the protagonist. He is able to blackmail Nora because of a loan document in his possession which bears the signature of her husband which she forged. Krogstad threatens to reveal the crime unless she persuades her husband to reinstate him in his position at the bank. Her husband Torvald is thus the antagonist, because he is adamant against rehiring Krogstad. Nora is torn between these two strong, determined men.

The dramatic question is whether Nora can persuade Torvald to hire Krogstad and what will happen if she can't succeed. The climax comes when Torvald receives the letter from Krogstad telling him about the forgery and what he will do with the document if Torvald does not relent. Although Nora is not the protagonist or antagonist, it is her story, everything is seen through her point of view, and the most important event in the play is the character change she undergoes when she sees her husband as he is and their relationship as it exists.

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