What dos Nathaniel realize about his identity at the end of the book?

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As an adult, Nathaniel recognizes that his parents' disappearance when he was a child significantly shaped who he is. Nathaniel acknowledges that he has intimacy issues and maintains an emotional distance in romantic relationships. Nathaniel perceives their departure as an abandonment and associates it with his lack of trust in...

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As an adult, Nathaniel recognizes that his parents' disappearance when he was a child significantly shaped who he is. Nathaniel acknowledges that he has intimacy issues and maintains an emotional distance in romantic relationships. Nathaniel perceives their departure as an abandonment and associates it with his lack of trust in others. Toward the end of the novel, Nathaniel recognizes that The Moth had been a father figure and had influenced his early years and the person he grew up to be.

Nathaniel takes a job at a government archive office and is responsible for altering files related to British espionage surrounding WWII. He learns that his mother Rose had been murdered by a Foreign operative 10 years before. She had taken on a codename, Viola, through which she committed immoral acts for the British. This changes Nathaniel's perception of his childhood, who his mother was, and in turn who he is. At the end of the novel, Nathaniel moves to the Suffolk village where his mother lived before she was killed, further emphasizing the significance of this loss.

Nathaniel notes that his search for identity mirrors that of Britain in the aftermath of the war. His search for identity is part of the novel's dominant theme, coming of age. His identity, like that of Britain, has been influenced by death and loss.

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