1984 Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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What does Winston find interesting about the place the dark haired girl took him? What does it remind him of?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The dark-haired woman who slips Winston a love letter is named Julia, and she leads him to a tranquil place outside of the bustling, dirty city, where they engage in an affair. After Winston takes the train outside of the city and travels to the pastoral location to meet Julia, he is astonished to recognize that he is in the Golden Country, which is a quiet rural location he has previously dreamed of. In Winston's dream of the Golden Country, there are rolling hills, trees swaying in the breeze, and dace swimming in clear pools of water. When Winston meets up with Julia, he mentions that the location reminds him of his dream regarding the Golden Country and asks her if there is a nearby stream with dace swimming in it. Julia confirms that there is indeed a pleasant stream nearby and the two dissidents proceed to have sex, which Winston considers a political act and blow struck against the Party.

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JOHN THORBURN eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In George Orwell's novel 1984, the main character, Winston Smith, begins a sexual affair with a dark-haired woman named Julia, who had slipped him a note at work that said "I love you". 

One of the first places that Smith and Julia meet is in a pasture outside of the city. As Smith walks along, he realizes that he has seen this place before: in a recurring dream. Smith calls this pastoral landscape "The Golden Country." In his dream, Smith had even imagined a girl with dark hair running toward him and tearing off her clothes. 

Now, Smith's dream becomes reality. In this chapter, Smith is actually in the pasture with the dark-haired girl, who, at one point, does sweep aside her clothing and the two make love: 

Their embrace had been a battle, the climax a victory. It was a blow struck against the Party. It was a political act.

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