What does "Wherefore could I not pronounce 'Amen'? I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen' stuck in my throat" mean?

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William Delaney eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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But wherefore could not I pronounce “Amen”?
I had most need of blessing, and “Amen”
Stuck in my throat.

These lines provide an excellent example of enjambment, a word defined in one dictionary as "The continuation of a sentence from one line or couplet of a poem to the next. Much English poetry, including Shakespeare's, is written in iambic pentameter because it was generally assumed that ten syllables was about as much as a person could speak without pausing for a breath. With enjambment, as in the last two lines quoted above, there is no logical place to pause, and it is as if there is only one long line reading: "I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen' stuck in my throat." The enjambment invites, or requires, the actor to speak the words "Stuck in my...

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gbeatty eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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bigmama97 | Student

macbeth is unforgived after commiting such a crime, especially since he has murdered a king, which is considered as sacrilegious act in those days. he cannot be forgived by god anymore and this further foreshadows his path to evil.

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