What does "Wherefore could I not pronounce 'Amen'? I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen' stuck in my throat" mean?

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But wherefore could not I pronounce “Amen”?
I had most need of blessing, and “Amen”
Stuck in my throat.

These lines provide an excellent example of enjambment, a word defined in one dictionary as "The continuation of a sentence from one line or couplet of a poem to the next. Much English poetry, including Shakespeare's, is written in iambic pentameter because it was generally assumed that ten syllables was about as much as a person could speak without pausing for a breath. With enjambment, as in the last two lines quoted above, there is no logical place to pause, and it is as if there is only one long line reading: "I had most need of blessing, and 'Amen' stuck in my throat." The enjambment invites, or requires, the actor to speak the words "Stuck in my throat" breathlessly, or hoarsely, as if the word "Amen" actually does stick in his throat. An actor might actually inhale as he speaks the words "Stuck in my throat." This vocal effect is usually...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 520 words.)

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