In Lord of the Flies, what does the voice of the schoolmaster represent?In Chapter 8 when Simon is talking to the lord of the flies, he feels unwell and the lord of the flies says, "This has...

In Lord of the Flies, what does the voice of the schoolmaster represent?

In Chapter 8 when Simon is talking to the lord of the flies, he feels unwell and the lord of the flies says, "This has gone quiet far enough. My poor misguided child, do you think you know better than I do? . . . I'm warning you. I'm going to get waxy. You're not wanted."

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eabettencourt eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Yes, at one point during this scene Simon perceives the Lord of the Flies's voice to be that of a schoolmaster, or at least we can infer that's what it reminds him of.  This is significant because as a young child, to Simon a schoolmaster would represent an authority figure, someone who makes and enforces rules and his own choice of order and structure.  When the boys first landed on the island, they tried to make their own rules, microcosmically falling in line with this concept.  Now that the Lord of the Flies, or the representation of the innate evil lurking in us all, has taken on the persona of the schoolmaster to Simon, it can be understood, by Simon especially, that this concept - the innate evil within us all - is what truly has the power and makes the rules on the island.  This is what he runs to tell the boys about - that this is what they should truly fear - when they attack and kill him.

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Lord of the Flies

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