Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez

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What does the tree dream at the beginning of "Chronicle of a Death Foretold" signify?

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thetall eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Santiago Nasar had two dreams during the opening of the story as told by the narrator. He tells his mother about the dreams but she is unable to foresee what they truly meant. In the first dream Santiago was moving through a grove of trees where it was drizzling lightly. In that moment he felt happy, however the happiness was short lived because when he woke up he found himself spattered with bird poop. The essence of his dreams and particularly the first one comes out clearly as one goes through the story. In the story, Santiago is butchered by the twin brothers Pablo and Pedro because of the...

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i29bob | Student

Nasars mother told of a dream that he had where he was "alone in a tinfoil airplane flying through the almond trees without bumping into anything" (5) perhaps signifying him dressed in his attire for special occasions (to see the Bishop) and going through the morning without anyone (the almond trees, signifying the skin tone of the population) telling him that someone was out to murder him.

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lit24 | Student

Santiago Nasar's  dreams are symbolic anticipations of his death-they are precognitive. On the morning that he was murdered Santiago woke up very early and told his mother that he had had a dream about how happy he was walking through a grove of timber  trees in light rain, but when he woke up he felt as though he was covered with bird droppings. He discussed his dreams with his mother Placida Linero because, she had "a well earned reputation as an accurate interpreter of other people's dreams, provided they were told her before eating." However, she did not consider the the dreams to foretell anything ominous, and after Nasar was murdered, "she never forgave herself."

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