What does To Kill a Mockingbird tell us about the world?

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird teaches us many valuable lessons about life and the world. It teaches us not to readily believe gossip or judge people before knowing them. It teaches us some unfortunate truths about racism, injustice, and the unfairness of life. It also teaches us the importance of doing what is right despite the possible consequences.

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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird teaches us many lessons about life and the world in which we live.

Two of the hardest truths of the world demonstrated in the novel are: life is not always fair and justice does not always prevail. These lessons are illustrated by the...

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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird teaches us many lessons about life and the world in which we live.

Two of the hardest truths of the world demonstrated in the novel are: life is not always fair and justice does not always prevail. These lessons are illustrated by the tragic life and death of Tom Robinson. After being wrongfully accused of rape, Tom is found guilty of a crime he did not commit. He is convicted solely because he is Black and his accuser and the jurors are all white. Atticus plans to appeal the verdict, but Tom is shot and killed by police officers while attempting to escape from prison.

The novel also teaches us, through Jem and Scout, not to judge a book by its cover or believe gossip and rumors. Young and naïve, Jem and Scout are initially quick to believe the Maycomb town gossip about their reclusive and mysterious neighbor, Boo Radley. According to rumors, Boo is insane, violent, and dangerous. We later learn that Boo is kind, gentle, and shy. He leaves presents for Jem and Scout throughout the novel. Near the conclusion of the story, Boo protects Jem and Scout and kills Bob Ewell in defense of the children. He is the exact opposite of everything he was said to be by the townspeople.

Atticus's representation of Tom Robinson, despite the certainty that Tom would be found guilty and the backlash he receives from the people of Maycomb, teaches us the importance of doing what is right and standing up for one's beliefs.

These are just a few of the many valuable lessons about life and the world portrayed in To Kill a Mockingbird.

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