What figurative language is used in Frost's "The Pasture?"

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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There are multiple examples of figurative language found in Robert Frost's poem "The Pasture."

The first use of figurative language appears in his use of repetition in the poem. Repetition is when a poet repeats a word, phrase, or line throughout a poem. Repetition is seen when Frost repeats the following:

1. "I shan't be gone long--you come too."

2. Repetition of "I" or derivatives of it throughout the poem.

Another example of figurative language is seen in line three. Here, alliteration is used. Alliteration is the repetition of a consonant sound within a line of poetry. In the poem, Frost repeats the "w" sound.

And wait to watch the water clear, I may.

One last example of figurative language is seen in line seven. Here, Frost uses assonance. Assonance is the repetition of a vowel sound. IN line seven, the "i" sound is repeated in the words "it" (used twice) and "licks." Assonance is also seen in lines four and eight ("I shan't be gone long--you come too") when the "o" of "gone" and "long" are repeated.

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