what does this novel tells us about humanity? The book deals with forgiveness and redemption. What are some of the "sins" that are committed and how do the people who commit these sins redeem...

what does this novel tells us about humanity?

The book deals with forgiveness and redemption. What are some of the "sins" that are committed and how do the people who commit these sins redeem themselves? Is it more important to receive forgiveness from an external source (another person) or from ourselves? What does this say about humanity?

Asked on by adiel0797

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teachertaylor | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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The novel seems to suggest that forgiving one's self is more important than the forgiveness of others.  Amir struggles for the entirety of the book to forgive himself for betraying Hassan even though Hassan does not hold a grudge against him when they meet years later.  As for the nature of humanity, the element of self-forgiveness seems to suggest that our own inner conflicts often fuel violence and hatred towards one another and that we can only fix these problems by first addressing our own personal issues.

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Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Wow! That's a lot of questions! First, numerous sins and transgressions are included in the novel, both sins of omission and sins of commission. Amir uses his power over Hassan to torment him on a regular basis, the result of Amir's own insecurity and self-hatred. He also fails to even try to protect Hassan when he is attacked. Baba fails to acknowledge Hassan as his son. The role of the Taliban in the novel points to the violence that human beings can inflict upon each other, and Assef demonstrates mankind's capacity to do evil. The goodness of humanity can be found in Hassan and in Amir's redemption. For Amir, self-forgiveness was essential to his moral growth and sense of integrity.

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mindysue | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

what does this novel tells us about humanity?

The book deals with forgiveness and redemption. What are some of the "sins" that are committed and how do the people who commit these sins redeem themselves? Is it more important to receive forgiveness from an external source (another person) or from ourselves? What does this say about humanity?

This was one of my most favorite novels.  The major "sin" in this novel is the father letting society influence his decision to not admit fathering an illegitimate son. Fear of society's judgement was so powerful, he watched his son suffer with a life less than what he could have provided.

If one can forgive one's self, usually by admitting wrongdoing, it is usually more poisiively accepted by society.  I think humanity if more forgiving than we are willing to risk to find out.

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