How does the denouement in Lord of the Flies affect the reader?What does this denouement effects by the reader? When you have read the book, you make a lot of thought and reflect the story several...

How does the denouement in Lord of the Flies affect the reader?

What does this denouement effects by the reader? When you have read the book, you make a lot of thought and reflect the story several times?

Asked on by abroader

2 Answers | Add Yours

sboeman's profile pic

sboeman | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted on

I agree with the previous posting.  Golding's message is clear: adults are involved in the same "games" as the children are, and we as readers must recognize this powerful example of dramatic irony, which is when the reader knows something that the characters are unaware of. 

Although adults might consider themselves more "sophisticated" or "mature", they, in essence, demonstrate the same behaviors that caused the deterioration of the society on the island.  Adults have leaders just like Jack and Ralph and for various reasons, these people have the ability to manipulate others' thoughts and behaviors.

The officer that rescues them should not be considered a deus ex machina, or some device that "saves the day"; rather, Golding purposefully uses this opportunity to show us that we - kids and adults alike - must face choices about how we choose to lead and who we choose to follow.

ms-mcgregor's profile pic

ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The denouement of the novel occurs right after Ralph is rescued by the British Navy. The British naval officer rebukes the boys and says he would have thought they would do better. In retrospect, it is obvious that the rescue team is unaware of the evil in mankind, of which they are very much a part. The British ship is searching for downed aircraft and instead finds a group of boys who have deteriorated into a bunch of savages. The irony is that the entire world has also deteriorated into another war. The difference this time is that the war involves nuclear weapons and the rescued boys will be returned to that world. Therefore, the boys' rescue may only be temporary because they may soon be killed in a nuclear blast. When the officer says he thinks the boys can do better, the irony is that the whole world should have done a better job of settling their differences so the war would never have had to happen and the boys would never have had to experience the horrors of on the tropical island. 

We’ve answered 318,989 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question