What does the recurrence of Miss Bobbit speaking of the devil throughout the story symbolize?

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The short story "Children on Their Birthdays" by Truman Capote tells the tale of Miss Lily Jane Bobbit, who dazzles the small Alabama town where she resides her mother. She makes frequent allusions to the devil. She also says,

I’ve had enough experience to know that there is...

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The short story "Children on Their Birthdays" by Truman Capote tells the tale of Miss Lily Jane Bobbit, who dazzles the small Alabama town where she resides her mother. She makes frequent allusions to the devil. She also says,

I’ve had enough experience to know that there is a God and that there is a Devil. But the way to tame the Devil is not to go down there to church and listen to what a sinful mean fool he is. No, love the Devil like you love Jesus:—because he is a powerful man, and will do you a good turn if he knows you trust him. He has frequently done me good turns.

Miss Bobbit mistakenly loves the devil. She believes that she can hold the devil—including ill fortune—at bay by assuaging him. She says that she asked the devil to help her leave the small town. She wants to go “somewhere else where everything is dancing, like people dancing in the streets, and everything is pretty, like children on their birthdays.”

It would be extreme to say that Miss Bobbit is wicked. She certainly displays kindness when she helps Rosalba after the local boys bully her. On the other hand, she also throws rocks at dogs with no provocation and is unashamed of dancing in a seductive manner. However, it is her view to "love the Devil like you love Jesus" that is most provocative.

She eventually gets her admirers to fund her departure and is set to leave when she is run over by the six o’clock bus. It is not chance that because she has asked the devil to help her, she does not achieve her goals. The underlying message seems to be that her view of the devil is a relatively immoral one and that even though she is a child, she must be punished.

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