What does the phrase “long-slumbering hospitality” imply about the grandmother and their house?

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In the short story "The White Heron," the phrase "long-slumbering hospitality" implies that the grandmother and the house are not accustomed to many visitors. The house is rather secluded in the New England wilderness and the sighting of other humans is rare. So rare, in fact, that the granddaughter is...

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In the short story "The White Heron," the phrase "long-slumbering hospitality" implies that the grandmother and the house are not accustomed to many visitors. The house is rather secluded in the New England wilderness and the sighting of other humans is rare. So rare, in fact, that the granddaughter is completely frightened when she hears the whistling of a human and is fearful upon being spotted by the friendly young man.

The slumbering hospitality of the grandmother, however, is one that quickly awakens upon the visitation of the young man to her home. She does not need to learn hospitality and is not begrudged to provide it, but she is merely not accustomed to having visitors and, therefore, her gentle, welcoming attitude is simply awakened.

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