What does the Nurse give to Romeo in act 3, scene 3 of Romeo and Juliet?

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Act 3, scene 3 begins with Romeo and Friar Lawrence talking together. The main topic of their conversation is Romeo's punishment.

Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

The friar informs Romeo that the prince has decided not to have Romeo executed. Instead, Romeo is to be banned...

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Act 3, scene 3 begins with Romeo and Friar Lawrence talking together. The main topic of their conversation is Romeo's punishment.

Father, what news? What is the Prince’s doom?

The friar informs Romeo that the prince has decided not to have Romeo executed. Instead, Romeo is to be banned from the city. Like an overreacting child, Romeo claims that banishment is worse than death.

Ha, banishment! Be merciful, say “death,”
For exile hath more terror in his look,
Much more than death. Do not say “banishment.”
Being a voice of reason, the friar tells Romeo to be far more grateful. Romeo gets to live. The friar tells Romeo that the world is "broad and wide," and that is a good reason to be happy about the punishment.
This is dear mercy, and thou seest it not.
The nurse will eventually enter this scene, and she says that she has come on Juliet's behalf. The nurse is looking for Romeo, and the nurse tells him that Juliet is beside herself with sadness. The friar then sets forth a plan that allows for Romeo to visit and comfort dear Juliet, and then the nurse gives Romeo a ring. Juliet told the nurse to give Romeo that particular ring.
Here, sir, a ring she bid me give you, sir.
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The Nurse gives Romeo a ring from his fair Juliet in Act 3, Scene 3.  The meat of the scene contains Friar Laurence, Romeo, and the Nurse contemplating Romeo's banishment from Verona after slaying Tybalt, but it ends with hope of Romeo and Juliet being reunited.  The Nurse is just about to leave in order to let Juliet know that Romeo is going to visit her secretly; however, right before she exits, she says, "Here sir, a ring she bid me give you, sir.  Hie you, make haste, for it grows very late."  Romeo's response is, "How well my comfort is revived by this!"  Romeo, then, prepares for his secret visit with Juliet, the reader can assume, while he is wearing his precious ring.

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