What does the narrator believe at the end of "The Yellow Wallpaper"?

By the end of "The Yellow Wallpaper," the narrator believes she has freed a woman who was trapped within the wallpaper. In a final twist, she declares, "I've got out at last" and "I've pulled off most of the paper, so you can't put me back!" Ultimately, the narrator believes that she is the woman who has been freed from the wallpaper, and she has obviously begun to suffer from some form of psychosis.

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By the end of "The Yellow Wallpaper," the narrator believes that she has, by peeling the wallpaper off the walls, freed a woman who was trapped by and within the paper itself. The narrator says,

I pulled and she shook, I shook and she pulled, and before morning...

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By the end of "The Yellow Wallpaper," the narrator believes that she has, by peeling the wallpaper off the walls, freed a woman who was trapped by and within the paper itself. The narrator says,

I pulled and she shook, I shook and she pulled, and before morning we had peeled off yards of that paper.

She claims that if the woman tries to get away, she will tie the woman up with a rope that she has hidden in the room. However, shortly thereafter, the narrator says that she does not like to look out her windows because of all the "creeping women" she sees outside, and she says, "I wonder if they all come out of that wallpaper as I did?" She also reveals that she now has the rope tied around her own waist. The narrator now seems to believe that she is the woman who was trapped in the wallpaper and that she has now been freed from that confinement. She says,

I suppose I shall have to get back behind the pattern when it comes night, and that is hard! It is so pleasant to be out in this great room and creep around as I please!

Rather than feeling trapped and powerless as her real self, the narrator has invented a new identity for herself as a free woman who enjoys the relative open space of the room because it is larger by far than the wallpaper in which she was previously trapped. In short, the narrator believes that she is now someone else, someone who is free and empowered rather than imprisoned and denied any agency.

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