What does the ghost tell Hamlet to do in the early part of Hamlet?

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In act 1, scene 5, the ghost of Hamlet's father urges the prince to seek revenge. At first, Hamlet expresses pity for the ghost's plight, but the ghost tells him not to feel bad for him. Instead, Hamlet should avenge his father's death. The ghost tells Hamlet that his...

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In act 1, scene 5, the ghost of Hamlet's father urges the prince to seek revenge. At first, Hamlet expresses pity for the ghost's plight, but the ghost tells him not to feel bad for him. Instead, Hamlet should avenge his father's death. The ghost tells Hamlet that his uncle Claudius murdered him one day by poisoning him as he slept. Hamlet is shocked to hear this news but not surprised, as he never had fond feelings for his uncle.

It seems that the ghost of Hamlet's father is as upset at Claudius's seduction of Queen Gertrude as he is for the murder itself. While he wants Hamlet to kill Claudius, he exhorts him not to harm Gertrude. He says that her punishment will be left up to fate.

He is also upset that he was killed before he could seek redemption for his many sins.

Unhouseled, disappointed, unaneled.
No reckoning made, but sent to my account
With all my imperfections on my head. (act 1, scene 5, 77–79)
The ghost urges Hamlet to set the throne of Denmark to right by killing Claudius and becoming king. This is as much a matter of honor as it is one of vengeance.
This whole exchange leaves Hamlet very confused and full of doubt. He is not sure if the ghost was really his father. Perhaps it was a trick of the devil. His indecisiveness compels him to investigate whether or not Claudius is indeed a murderous villain.
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The Ghost tells Hamlet to avenge his death. He was murdered by Claudius, who snuck into the garden while he was asleep one day and poured poison down his ear. Though Hamlet is suitably shocked by the news, he's hardly surprised as he's never trusted his wicked uncle/stepfather. In any case, Hamlet now knows what he has to do. The big question is how, and it's a question that will eat up an inordinate amount of the young prince's time.

The Ghost also tells Hamlet that Claudius has corrupted Gertrude, but that he, Hamlet, shouldn't harm her in any way. Gertrude should be "left to heaven" and to contend with her own conscience. Hamlet is even less successful in carrying out the Ghost's wishes with regards to Gertrude than in relation to Claudius. For although Hamlet won't physically harm his mother, he will nonetheless cause her no end of emotional pain due to his feigned madness and the vicious tongue-lashing he will give her later on in the play.

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The ghost of Hamlet's father tells Hamlet that he was murdered by Claudius. As he was napping in the garden, Claudius poured poison into his ear. Because he had no chance to confess and be absolved of his sins, the dead King Hamlet must wander the earth as a ghost. He tells the younger Hamlet not to harm his mother, who has married Claudius. He also tells Hamlet to avenge his murder. This directive sets the plot of the play in motion.

Although at first very shaken and determined to seek vengeance, on reflection Hamlet decides that he would be better off to make sure that the ghost was not sent by the devil to trick him into killing an innocent man. Therefore, Hamlet decides he must set up an experiment to test whether Claudius is guilty of the murder.

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In Act I, Scene V, of Hamlet, the ghost tells Hamlet to avenge his death. The ghost reveals himself as Hamlet's recently deceased father and claims to be the victim of a "foul and most unnatural murder." He tells Hamlet that the story of his death, as told by his uncle, is completely false: a snake did not bite him while he slept in the orchard. In truth, Hamlet's uncle crept upon him as he slept and poured a vial of poison into his ear. The poison got quickly to work, leaving the king no time to repent of his sins. As a result, he is now trapped in a horrible place called purgatory. 

After the ghost leaves, it becomes clear that his plea for revenge has been successful. Hamlet refers to his uncle as a "villain" and his mother as "pernicious." In short, Hamlet's mind can think of nothing but revenge. 

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In Act I Sc. V of Hamlet, the ghost of Hamlet's father speaks to Hamlet.

The ghost tells Hamlet to do three things.

a) The ghost informs him that he was not killed by a snake bite, as most people were led to believe, but rather was killed by his brother Claudius, who now is married to Hamlet's mother and is King.  The ghost tells Hamlet to revenge this "most foul, strange, and unnatural" murder.

This task is, of course, the one that Hamlet hesitates to do throughout the play.

b) The Ghost says to Hamlet that he should not let his "soul contrive(90)
Against [his] mother aught."  In other words, he should do no harm to his mother, even though she has acted treacherously by marrying her husband's murderer.

c) Before the Ghost leaves, he says to Hamlet, "Remember me."  The meaning of this phrase is debatable.  Is it a new directive, in which the Ghost commands Hamlet to always revere his memory?  Or is the Ghost just telling Hamlet that he should remember to carry out the instructions that he has already given him?

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