What message is the speaker trying to convey  in "On Wenlock Edge"?

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What the speaker is talking about is the idea that all people share the same troubles and that all people's troubles come to nothing in the end.

The speaker is imagining the feelings of a Roman who was, centuries ago, in the same place that he is now.  He imagines...

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What the speaker is talking about is the idea that all people share the same troubles and that all people's troubles come to nothing in the end.

The speaker is imagining the feelings of a Roman who was, centuries ago, in the same place that he is now.  He imagines that the Roman had the same kinds of concerns that he has and he says that the tree of human life is "never quiet."  This shows us that people have always had problems.

But then, at the end of the poem, he also says that the Roman is dead and buried now.  This implies (whether for good or bad) that the speaker, too, will one day die and will no longer have to think of his problems.

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